News & Media

Hose Reel Study: Dead vs Live

  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield
  • Ergo testing on reels Knoxfield

By: CFA News

Category: Planning & Research, Vehicles / Equipment / Buildings

  1.40 PM 11 April, 2014


Location: General

Views: 7323

A team working on the design of a new prototype medium pumper, now under construction, has taken a careful look at CFA research into live hose reel versus dead reel systems.

Read more about the medium pumper prototype and its design

The study, undertaken by Peter Langridge (CFA Health & Safety) was undertaken in March 2013, and compared the physiological and biomechanical demands of the two systems over a distance of 45 metres.

This work was undertaken specifically to aid with the redesign of CFA’s current Medium Pumper.

Results of the study indicated that deploying a dead hose over the 45 metres was not only more time-efficient, but minimised physiological, thermal, biomechanical and muscular strain.

Individuals also required at least two pulls to reach the 45-metre mark with the live hose, making it more of a challenge to adopt correct technique and focus on safety.

Ten volunteer firefighters, both male and female, participated in the research, and were required to:

1) Drag out a line of 38mm hose connected to a nozzle, from both dead reel mounted on a tanker,
a distance of 45m.

2) Drag a llive hose reel from a Heavy Pumper, a distance of 45m.

Physiological data collected included heart rate, respiration rate, core temperature and skin temperature.

Biomechanical data collected included trunk inclination, lateral flexion, shoulder elevation and shoulder muscle activity (EMG).

Last Updated: 11 April 2014